China

Russian serial daredevils conquer a Hong Kong skyscraper, could Tokyo Skytree be next?【Video】

You might remember the On The Roofs duo from last February when they ventured to trespass and scale the world’s second highest skyscraper, Shanghai Tower. They then uploaded videos for our entertainment – that is, if your idea of entertainment includes watching young guys in imminent danger of falling 632m (2,073-ft) to their death.

The Russian duo of Vadim Makhorov and Vitaliy Raskalov are back again with a new, slightly less nausea-inducing video, “What’s up Hong Kong?” The now renowned rooftop photographers headed a four-man party on their recent visit to Hong Kong, specifically, to the China Online Centre building in the Wan Chai area. But, this time they added a new challenge to their trespassing antics.

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Chinese woman’s catty comeback to Korean colleague gets netizens talking

On October 10 a Chinese woman wrote a post on an internet message board about how she spoke back to a rude Korean colleague, and it soon sparked comments and debate on Korean and Chinese attitudes towards fake goods, and towards each other.

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Neither guilt nor escaped alligator stops Chinese crowd from looting spilled crustacean cargo

You never know what the day’s going to throw at you when you get up in the morning. For example, when a large group of residents of China’s Changsha left their homes last Wednesday, they didn’t know they were just hours away from getting crabs.

Don’t worry, the city hasn’t had a sudden outbreak of pubic lice. Instead, a seafood delivery car spilled its cargo onto the road, creating a swarm of looters who scooped up the animals for themselves.

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China and the US have very different stereotypes for the same cars

The Chinese auto market is a young one, but it is already the world’s biggest, and a key region for the global auto industry.

But to sell cars there, it’s more than a question of translating manuals and opening a few dealerships.

Over the last 30 years, according to the New York Times, the Chinese public has also formed some very strong opinions as to who drives a particular make and model and why — and those views are often at odds with how brands are perceived in the U.S.

For non-Chinese automakers, understanding those perceptions is key to putting more cars on the road.

[An earlier version of this article was written by Alex Davies and Travis Okulski.]

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Chinese politician says kung fu movies show why umbrella protesters must be stopped

A lawmaker in Hong Kong who supports the Chinese government reportedly cited Kung Fu movies as a justification for the violent crackdown on the protesters who have become known as the “Umbrella Revolution.”

According to the South China Morning Post, the politician, Leung Che-cheung, told his colleagues on the Hong Kong Legislative Council the umbrellas protesters have been using to block tear gas could be used as an “aggressive weapon” and necessitated a violent response by police officers. To prove his point, Leung cited martial arts movies.

“It is basic common sense that an umbrella can be an aggressive weapon, but many lawmakers are just completely ignorant about history,” Leung said.

Hong Kong police have been battling the anti-government protesters since last month with tear gas, pepper spray, and alleged beatings.

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Does this video about an abandoned dog leave you wiping your eyes or shaking your fist?

Generally speaking, I’m not the biggest fan of abstract personality tests. Every now and again, though, something comes around that really seems to shed light on how an individual’s mind works.

For example, if you’re extremely pure-hearted, you might see this short video of a dog reminiscing about the happy days with his former owners as a moving, even tear-jerking story. On the other hand, if you’re a bit more cynical or strict in personality, it might make you want to punch your monitor.

So which camp do you fall into? Read on and see.

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‘LEAGUE OF LEGENDS’ FINALS: Meet the kids facing off in the biggest sporting event of the month

“League of Legends” is one of the most popular e-sports games in the world right now, boasting a staggering 67 million active monthly players, according to a recent article in The New York Times.

The most important moment of the year for “LoL” fans is happening on Saturday: the finals of the “League of Legends” World Championships. It will be held in a stadium in Seoul that was built for the 2002 soccer World Cup.

The top prize is $1 million, a roughly 70-pound trophy called the Summoner’s Cup, and, of course, bragging rights.

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Awesome Air Umbrella from China keeps you dry with blasts of air

It’s raining in Yokohama right now. I’m about to go pick up lunch, though, which means that when I head out the door I’ll need to take my umbrella, which is a cheap collapsible model I bought for 500 yen (US$4.60).

But should I decide to upgrade, a team of engineers in China is developing an umbrella that shields you from the rain not with a sheet of flimsy nylon, but with blasts of air, in the form of the aptly named Air Umbrella.

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Brave Chinese boy demonstrates how NOT to go down a waterslide

Who doesn’t love going to the water park during the hot summer months? Between splashing in the water and goofing around with your friends, it might be the best way to spend a sizzling Saturday afternoon. And, of course, the waterslides are probably the best part! They’re as much fun as a slip’n’slide without the worry of zipping off into mom’s rose bushes. Though they can present dangers of their own, as one boy in China learned this year…

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“We’ll give you the best price!” for a townhouse in a Chinese ghost villa 【Photos】

China is the biggest emerging market in the world. The booming middle class is quickly becoming upper-middle class and they are all looking for the next cool thing that will distinguish them from their lowly middle-middle class friends. With a large amount of open space outside the big cities, China is developing a lot of suburbs which seem to draw their inspiration from the townhouse wonderlands of the US. This may work in theory, but sometimes, a number of different factors can turn a dream town into a ghost town!

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Brave through tear gas with this DIY budget gas mask【Instructions】

Back on the topic of the Occupy Central demonstration taking place in Hong Kong in protest for electoral democracy, little progress has been made to resolve the situation, though there have been reports of planned talks between the government and representatives from the protesting group. More than a week has passed since the Occupy protesters started camping at several locations, staying put despite assaults from opposing factions and refusing to budge even as the police brought in tear gas and pepper spray.

As complete outsiders, we have no say on how things ought to be handled, and we’re definitely not taking sides, but if there’s one thing we could all learn from this protest, it’s how to make your own DIY tear gas mask. A YouTuber from Hong Kong shows us how!

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KFC is counting on these new menu items to save business in China

KFC parent company Yum Brands was hit hard by a Chinese food safety scandal.

The company cut the profit outlook in a recent earnings announcement. Sales in China fell 14% in the most recent quarter as consumers doubted the brand’s quality.

Executives told analysts that it was counting on some new rice dishes to revive sales. Because these dishes are seen as more high-end, the KFC team believes they could improve perception of the brand.

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Number of tourists visiting the Great Wall of China last weekend more of a sight than the wall itself

The crowded image above might appear to be another pro-democracy rally like we’ve been seeing a lot of in Hong Kong recently, but actually it’s just business as usual for a historic landmark on a long holiday.

With 1 October being National Day in China, people are taking advantage of their one week off to head on down to one of the most famous World Heritage Sites around. However, since a considerable amount of people share the same holiday plans, for one week this testament to mankind’s engineering prowess is eclipsed by a testament to mankind’s determination for sightseeing.

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Man’s rejected proposal goes viral as he tries to turn a ‘no’ into a ‘yes’【Photos】

A marriage proposal is supposed to be a special personal thing, it’s the chance to ask your significant other if they will be with you until the end. You want to make it an intimate and unique occasion, and do we have to mention again, personal. But with the advent of the Internet, more and more marriage proposals are going public as everyone tries to show how clever they are.

For as many amazing proposals there are nowadays, there should be an equal number of heartbreaking rejections out there. You probably don’t see many of them because no one wants to publish their failure online, especially after your heart was just put through a giant wringer. Unfortunately, if you propose in public, you don’t have a choice to share your moment or not, since any random bystander can take pictures of you popping the question. And as you will see, sometimes the results aren’t pretty.

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Ikea in China becomes field test site for all life functions, including peeing 【Photos】

A lot of times, buying furniture is sort of a leap of faith. Sure, that sofa might seem alright when you sit down on it in the showroom for a couple of minutes, but is it really comfy enough for a full afternoon of watching football and drinking beer, plus the two-hour alcohol-induced nap that’ll follow?

Since home furnishings are designed to last for at least a couple of years, you want to spend as much time with them as you can before deciding which model to buy. That’s why Ikea stores encourage customers to sit and lie on the display models for as long as they like, with some shoppers in China taking the offer to make themselves at home as far as they can.

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Popular old-school Japanese anime gets its own restaurant for adoring Chinese fans

Despite the increasingly obvious and alarm-inducing deterioration of the political relationship between Japan and China, it appears there’s one Japanese export the Chinese just can’t possibly bring themselves to boycott: Manga and anime.

Even at a time when the Chinese are openly fist-fighting other Chinese in the streets for the crime of choosing a Japanese car, manga and anime – especially, it seems, of the old-school variety – have pervaded Chinese pop culture to the point that it’s not only accepted to read it regularly, some Chinese business owners are going to great lengths to cash in on the popularity of Japan’s biggest pop cultural export.

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“Spies” from the police force confuse and anger Hong Kong protesters

As many of you probably already know, protests are going on in Hong Kong as a portion of its citizens are demanding for electoral democracy. The protest, which began on 26 September, triggered off a chain of events, from students boycotting classes, to thousands of people occupying several major areas of the bustling city in demonstration, to mysterious flying objects, and now, mysterious doppelgängers.

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New UFO caught on tape at Hong Kong protest may spell the end of UFO videos as we know them

As protesters in Hong Kong continue fighting to have a thin veil of “democracy” offered by the mainland Chinese government replaced by a slightly better veil enjoyed by other countries around the world, another story has emerged.

It appears that a UFO has been caught on tape hovering above the massive demonstration. Sure, we’ve seen videos of mysterious moving lights in the sky before, but this one may really change the way we look at UFO videos from here on out.

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Confusion as bizarre mass pants-ripping occurs at Chinese military reserve training

Chinese media is abuzz with serious concerns about the combat effectiveness of China’s military as it was revealed that, at a recent college military reserve training session, over 100 reservists’ camouflage pants simultaneously ripped out of nowhere.

The explosive rippage was apparently triggered when around 4,500 reservists – both men and women – were commanded by a drill instructor to sit down. We can only assume the drill instructor was the Chinese equivalent of R. Lee Ermy, as some of the reservists apparently took his command so seriously that they sat down with enough force to utterly destroy the stitching in their standard issue pants.

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Chinese cat with unfortunate dark patch of fur tired of people asking why it’s shocked

Banye is an 11-year-old British Shorthair from China. Eleven is getting up there for a cat, and in those years he’s been asked “Oh my god! What is it?!” far too many times.

You see, Banye has an affliction that affects an estimated one in every 70,000 cats. It’s called emoticontism and the disorder presents itself as an arrangement of dark fur typically just below the mouth. As a result the feline must go through life constantly looking surprised much like variations of this emoticon (゜д゜).

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