buildings

Japanese family lives and works in a milk carton house in Hiroshima

Forget the little old lady who lived in a shoe; there’s a Japanese family who lives in a milk carton.

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Rare photos from inside North Korea’s mysterious buildings

Kim Jong Suk Creche, Pyongyang Oliver Wainwright

For 10 days, architect, photographer, and architecture and design critic for The Guardian, Oliver Wainwright, traveled to Pyongyang, North Korea where he got tours inside buildings, with permission to photograph.

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Japanese photographer captures gorgeous photos of timeless building facades in Tokyo

It must take Hitoshi Kobayashi a long time to walk anywhere if his collection of photographs is any indication. The photographer has been gaining attention online for his galleries of photos dedicated solely to the facades of local buildings tucked away in the quiet streets and alleyways of suburban Tokyo. In fact, taking a stroll through his pictures is almost like being spirited away to another world and time altogether. 

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Shibuya Station 2019: one step closer to the Neo-Tokyo of our dreams

If you’ve been to Shibuya Station recently, you’ll have seen one area in particular that’s filled with crowds, noise and trucks; and it’s not the meeting place around the famous statue of Hachiko.

It’s the massive redevelopment project currently underway to revitalise the district and deliver a completely new-looking Shibuya by 2027. Latest pictures of the next high-rise in the pipeline reveal just how amazing life in Neo-Tokyo will be.

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Buildings in China slowly collide, shoddy worksmanship suspected

The Leaning Tower of Pisa might be able to draw huge crowds due to the fact that it’s a bit on the wonky side, but generally we prefer our buildings to stand upright. It’s no surprise, then, that locals in Shanghai, China were quite rightfully a bit flustered when these two apartment buildings decided to lean on each other for a bit of a rest. But what prompted these separately-constructed buildings to start nuzzling each other, and is this really safe?

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China’s “paper building” looks like it would topple over if we pushed hard enough

It’s no secret that the apartments and houses in Japan are incredibly small, especially in saturated areas such as Tokyo. But even Japan’s tiny homes are no match for this extremely narrow “paper building” in Shanghai, China! How do people even live in there?!
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10 incredible tiny houses in Japan: a photo tour

Despite being known as the office video game nerd here at RocketNews24, one of my secret passions is architecture. But not just any old architecture, oh no; the only thing that interests me is kyoushou juutaku micro homes where, either for the sake of the environment or out of financial necessity, houses are designed to make use of incredibly small or narrow spaces, at once cutting their carbon footprint and making use of land that would otherwise be left open or swallowed up by other, more grandiose properties.

With more than 70 percent of Japan’s total landmass unsuitable for building on account of sprawling forests and mountain ranges, the country’s urban population pay through the nose for real estate. In spite of this, many Japanese aspire to the typical Western ideal of home ownership, saving their money to buy homes much larger than they genuinely need, complete with plastic facades designed to look like bricks and mortar. Some, though, are shunning the notion entirely and are turning the act of simplifying both their lives and homes into a fine art, designing houses that are not just small but intelligent and stylish.

Come with us now as we take a look at just a few of Japan’s incredible micro homes.

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China’s 10 weirdest buildings as chosen by foreigners, People’s Daily Building debuts at #1

Last year the netizens of China got together and voted on the most bizarre buildings in the “Outrageous Architecture Championship of China”. This event helped raise awareness about the ever-receding limits of Chinese design since the booming economy began.

This year, voting was held again. However, rather than Chinese nationals, foreigners were called upon to judge which buildings were the funniest, gaudiest, and most confusing of the lot. The results were presented by Ben Hedges in his program: A Laowai’s View of China. Let’s see what they were.

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