business

Let’s learn how to properly sit in a chair in Japan from the pros

We’ve been doing it wrong this whole time, and probably so have you!

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Window in life when Japanese people can act like individuals is depressingly short, tweet asserts

Appreciate it while it lasts, because it won’t last long, say those who agree.

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Meeting at Hogwarts? Tokyo rental conference room is like a page from Harry Potter’s adventures

Not a fan of the boy wizard? Maybe you’d prefer to hold your meeting in the Wonderland room instead.

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Synchronized dance group World Order stars in new commercial showcasing basic business skills

The crisply suited men of World Order are here to teach you some basic Japanese business tricks (and advertise an energy drink while they’re at it).

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This is a pretty worrying chart for China’s demographic future

It’s no secret that many countries face looming demographics problems as their populations age.

Much has been written about developed markets like Japan, Germany, and Italy, which have the largest percentages of their populations age 65 and up.

But another country also deserves attention: China.

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What’s the point? Young Japanese professionals list five business manners they find unnecessary

With rules regarding everything from tea to elevators, some new employees think it’s all too much.

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Anime talent agency explicitly rejects voice actress applicants who have appeared in pornography

Ad for Tokyo auditions lets would-be anime stars know that they won’t be working in the booth if they’ve previously done work with their clothes off.

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97 percent of Kumamoto convenience stores open for business just three days after major quakes

Kumamoto Prefecture is still reeling after back-to-back large scale earthquakes struck the region late last week. Yet somehow Japan’s major convenience store chains have managed to get 97 percent of their shops up and running in a matter of days.

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Here’s why you should never take “almost no overtime” at face value when job hunting in Japan

Unless your definition of “almost none” is “enough to get a side job.” Then go right ahead.

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What do Japanese kids want to be when they grow up? Businesspeople

It does pay better than being a superhero, after all.

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New anime studio employee gets his first paycheck…and is shocked at how small it is

There’s a reason why the same parents who encourage their kids to become doctors or lawyers don’t try to steer them into becoming anime studio employees.

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The number one movie in Japan last weekend awakens to be…Yo-kai Watch!

What were you expecting?

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China could give 100 million people new identities in a bid to save its economy

Chinese officials are set to discuss ways to stimulate the country’s sputtering housing market during its Central Economic WorkingConference later this month, according to Chinese state media.

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Women’s fashion retailer “ISIS” investigated by Chinese police, declared terror-free

Although minor, one of the many crimes against humanity that the group sometimes referred to as “Islamic State of Iraq and Syria” has committed is ruining the abbreviation ISIS. You can bet the ancient Egyptian god is pissed, and now even a boutique in China has gotten some heat.

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Foxconn employees accidentally tell off founder Terry Gou 【Video】

A couple of workers at the world’s largest electronics manufacturer Foxconn were seen telling off an old man during a smoke break saying “It’s none of your f**king business.”

How wrong they were…

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Chinese woman, 25, demands workers’ compensation, says “Overtime made me an old lady”

On November 18 a young woman was spotted on the streets of Shenzhen City in Guangdong, China carrying a sign which read: “Overnight and overtime work has made me into an old lady. Both my love and work lives are miserable. I request approval for workers’ compensation.”

It was an unusual yet straightforward demand that triggered debate and reflection on the state of working conditions in the country.

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The new “Snow Turtle” train is slower than running, but at least you won’t get tired

Japan is famous for fast trains, but one new line crawls along at 14 kilometers (8.7 miles) per hour! Can the ultra-slow Snow Turtle save an endangered company?

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Japan’s rags-to-riches Nepalese restaurant “Daisuki Nippon” closes doors after five years

November marks five years since Vikas Pradhan sent out his first tweets in broken Japanese describing the hardships of starting a restaurant. In response and a heartwarming show of support, the Twitter community rallied behind Pradhan not only online but in actual paid visits to his Nepalese cuisine restaurant Daisuki Nippon, putting it firmly in the black.

However, in a rather sudden turn of events, Pradhan tweeted that as of 31 October the original Daisuki Nippon had closed down.

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Meetings and more meetings: Foreigners list the pros and cons of working at a Japanese company

It’s no secret that Japan may be headed for a bit of a labor crunch, as the population ages and many older workers reach retirement age with fewer young up-and-comers to replace them. And, while the Japanese government seems reluctant to take measures to replenish the shrinking workforce with foreign laborers, non-Japanese workers are nevertheless entering Japanese corporations and workplaces in record numbers.

But Japanese offices are also notorious for their long hours, slow pace of advancement, and frequent, long meetings. Traditional Japanese companies seem stuck in an old-school work culture even as companies in the rest of the world offer increasingly progressive work-life balance programs, workplace perks, and office hours.

With this stark contrast in mind, our Japanese sister site tracked down seven non-Japanese workers to get their for-realsies impressions of what it’s actually like to work at a Japanese company.

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Japanese employment site reimagines web developers, accountants, and more as anime RPG heroes

Career arcs in Japan used to be simple. You finished school, got a job, and worked there until it was time to retire. Along the way, you were paid a salary calculated strictly on the basis of how long you’d been with the company.

That’s not necessarily the case anymore, and as more and more Japanese switch employers, and even industries, they need a baseline from which to evaluate the pay of potential posts, which is where Japanese website Kyuryo Bank comes in. Yes, Kyuryo Bank has all the salary-related numerical data and progression charts you’d expect, but it also has something truly unique: awesome anime-style illustrations of professions ranging from public accountant and lawyer to web designer, pro blogger, and yes, even “chicken sexer.”

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