censorship

Japan’s censorship of PlayStation 4 horror game Until Dawn is spectacularly bad 【Video】

Considering it’s the same country that gave us movies like Battle Royale, Tokyo Gore Police and Ichi the Killer, Japan’s method of handling violent video game content can be quite perplexing at times.

Despite being able to attack the undead hordes in survival horror beat-em-up Dead Rising with everything from ‘wet floor’ signs to katanas, decapitations were notably absent from the Japanese version of the game when it released back in 2006. More recently, Japanese Metal Gear Solid and Gears of War fans were shocked to see that numerous scenes and animations were cut from the versions released in their homeland, even though the games were clearly marked as “adults only”.

Japan’s video game censors have struck again this week, this time taking their (presumably family-friendly) hatchets to newly released PlayStation 4 horror game Until Dawn—and the method of censoring the scenes deemed too much for Japan is startlingly bad.

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Artist strikes back at Indonesian government’s Internet censorship with parodic moe character

If you’re in Indonesia and trying to view some lewd content on the Internet, it will most likely be blocked. Strict Internet content regulations have been an area of controversy for some time in the country, but a recent development has put a new spin – and a new face – on the fight against governmental censorship.

Ipo-chan is a moe anthropomorphism of the Indonesian Ministry of Communication’s web-filtering service, “Internet Postif”. She’s cute, she looks tough, and she’s becoming so much more than the embodiment of Internet police.

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Young people around Beijing have suddenly begun taking selfies in front of a Uniqlo shop as a part of a recent trend that started online. Many of the photographs depict a man standing behind his girlfriend, occasionally in provocative poses.

The reason for these peculiar pics is a graphic sex tape that went viral in China showing a man and women having intercourse inside a Uniqlo dressing room. The video has become a hit in a country that strictly prohibits such material from being available to the population.

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China swings its ban hammer, blacklists 38 Japanese anime from the Internet

It had been rumored for some time that China’s government would be clamping down on sites that stream Japanese anime. The likes of Naruto and One Piece especially were hotly tipped for the Chinese government’s chopping block, but when an official list of prohibited shows recently went public, not only were anime fans in China saddened to see the aforementioned titles pulled from streaming sites, but another 38 popular Japanese anime were blacklisted due to their lewd and violent content.

Did your favorite series get pulled from the Chinese Internet? Check out the list of the fallen after the jump.

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Those of you who spend much time thinking about sports, international politics, or moaning, naked women might recall the incident a few years ago where Chinese soccer fans held up banners proclaiming “The Senkaku Islands belong to us! Sola Aoi belongs to the world!” The dual proclamation served as a simultaneous declaration of their territorial stance towards the disputed land masses and their egalitarian attitude regarding the Japanese porn star-turned singer and actress who’s amassed a massive fanbase in China.

The Senkaku issue remains a thorny one, in part complicated by the islands stubborn refusal to simply pick a side in the spat between Japan and China and move themselves closer to one country or the other. Sola, on the other hand, is much more mobile, and may be taking the comment about the whole world having the right to bask in her aura to heart as she’s reportedly considering moving her target market from China to Southeast Asia.

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Apple would rather you not blow up teen couples on your iPhone, asks developer to edit video game

In a lot of ways, digital distribution of video games is a great thing, as it allows developers to easily add new content to a title after its release. It’s a double-edged sword, though, and that same streamlined pathway from programmer to player can also be used to quickly make changes that take things away.

A few weeks ago, we took a look at a smartphone game whose lonely, jaded protagonist and his mystical, jaded companion use their powers to make affectionate couples meet with a host of calamities, including straight blowing them up. Apple, however, is not cool with this sort of vengeful fantasy, and so the iOS version of the game is being toned down and given a new name since the original title, Explode, Real Types! no longer describes the game’s contents.

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All censor, no sense: Recent cover-ups in Jojo anime are laughably bad, kind of pointless

Anime fans are used to all sorts of censorship going on in the foreign releases of their favorite shows, from painting over revealing outfits, to changing characters’ genders and relationships to “mask” themes of homosexuality, to even removing entire scenes or episodes deemed inappropriate.

But the Japanese release of a recent episode of Jojo’s Bizarre Adventure has been censored even before being aired abroad. Not only is the reason for the coverups confusing, but the terrible job they’ve done has viewers wondering what the point of censoring was to begin with.

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Aichi Prefectural Museum of Art forced to cover up “obscene” photos following complaint

When police arrested Japanese artist Rokudenashiko last month for distributing 3-D printer plans for models of her vagina, the world was at once baffled and outraged. But despite all the fuss that was raised over the artist’s arrest, it looks like the Japanese police are at it again, this time targeting the Aichi Prefectural Museum of Art for an exhibition featuring nude photography by the Japanese photographer Ryudai Takano.

Though no one has been arrested, the museum made headlines after it partially covered some of Ryudai’s photographs with cloth after local police deemed the images “obscene.” However, many in Japan are questioning the legitimacy of the cops’ actions.

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Chinese “porn identification officer” has seen over 600,000 adult videos, threw up after watching some

Some guys might think that the best job on earth would be to watch adult videos all day and get paid for it. Well, the good news is, there really are such jobs out there. The bad news is, these jobs might not be as fun and easy as you think.

At 59 years old, Chunqi Liu has been working as a professional “porn identification officer” for five years, assisting police investigations on cases involving illegal distribution and possession of pornographic materials in China. He has seen over 600,000 adult videos to date. That averages out to about 329 videos per day! Does that sound like an awesome job to you? He says it makes him throw up.

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Censored scene shows newest Metal Gear doesn’t pull any punches (except in Japan) 【Video】

Once upon a time, the North American video game market was incredibly squeamish about gory content. The blood and guts present in Japanese releases were painstakingly removed, most hilariously with the North American version of Neo Geo title Samurai Shodown, which retailed for $200 in 1993. Apparently the game’s producers thought their customer base was old enough to have that kind of cash in their pockets, but still too young to handle the sight of a little crimson hemoglobin, so they replaced the fountains of blood that occurred in the game’s swordfights with geysers of what appeared to be highly pressurized milk.

Eventually, everyone saw how silly this was. Gamers as a whole were getting older and more mature, and the youth of Japan, where this kind of content had been allowed for years, weren’t turning into crazed remorseless killing machines. So restrictions were loosened, allowing games like Grand Theft Auto to top North American sales charts.

Now, things have come full circle, as a side by side video comparison of publisher Konami’s Metal Gear Solid V: Ground Zeroes shows less graphic content in its Japanese version.

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Dragon Ball Kai: Beautifully remastered but woefully censored for a new generation

A few years back, Dragon Ball Kai was broadcast as a remastered version of the Dragon Ball Z series from the Raditz story arc to the Cell events when production stopped due to the Tohoku Earthquake of 2011. This series boasted more vivid colors, updated music and new voice actors to appeal to a new generation of viewers.

Such changes could be seen as improvement, but surely upset some hardcore fans of the original series with the thinking “if it ain’t broke, don’t fix it.” However, recently even more casual fans are calling the new series a “corruption” of the original after learning that moves were also made to tone down some of Dragon Ball Z’s violence.

Read on to see which classic scene got “cleaned up.”

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Film critic proposes censoring latest Studio Ghibli anime for overseas release

The newest theatrical anime from Studio Ghibli, Kaguya Hime no Monogatari, opened just over a week ago. While we came away impressed, the movie-going public at large hasn’t been coming out in the numbers expected for a release by the legendary animation production house.

Now, one film critic is speculating that the movie may have trouble bolstering its lackluster box office numbers with overseas revenue, stating his opinion that Kaguya Hime no Monogatari may not be screenable in certain markets outside Japan without censoring multiple scenes.

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Censorship gone wild: Thailand’s kids deprived of swimsuits and bare chests

If you thought America was gung-ho about censorship, wait ’til you see Thailand’s approach. As the following gallery will show, the broadcasting department’s censors have been unleashed on kids’ anime favourites with a lethal force.

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Japan’s Asahi News shut down on China’s version of Twitter

Asahi Shimbun, one of Japan’s oldest and largest national newspapers appears to have run into problems with China’s censorship. For two days straight the company’s accounts on China’s microbloggling sites such as Sina Weibo and Tencent Weibo have been frozen. As of last night no reason has been given for this action.

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LDP still promises to ‘re-examine’ historical textbooks, possibly replace sensitive words

Less than a year following the Liberal Democratic Party (LDP) of Japan’s victory in the House of Representatives (Lower House) election which allowed it to take power in the country, Japan is now facing the House of Councilors election next month.

Now, with a few months of consecutive leadership under their belts, the LDP have made some adjustments to their campaign promises from the previous elections but remain firm on their promise to re-evaluate Article 9, which prohibits Japan from having an army for offensive purposes.

They also will still look into the “Neighboring Countries Clause” which deals with how historical events are dealt with in education in order to foster good relations with other Asian countries. Some fear that such a review could lead to a whitewashing of certain events such as the Nanjing Massacre.

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Swimsuit Scene Deemed Too Raunchy for American Audience

America is known for being particularly prudent when it comes to sex and nudity, and the censors have been at it again in the US release of new Fire Emblem Awakening content. Someone somewhere has judged an image in the game to be far too naughty for sensitive American eyes, incurring the wrath and bemusement of fans around the globe. Read More

Parents Group in Russia Deems Death Note ‘Harmful Matter,’ Requests Ban

On 24 April in the Ural region of Russia, a parents group published an open letter to President Vladimir Putin asking that the popular Death Note manga series be regulated in all its forms (print, anime, live action).

Death Note was a Shonen Jump series that ran from 2003 to 2006 and centered on Light Yamagi, a student who stumbles upon a magical notebook which has the power to kill people simply by writing their names in it.

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Chinese Authorities to Issue Ban on Using Quotes from Weibo and Foreign Media Sources

It became evident on the 16th that as a general rule, Chinese authorities would soon ban domestic media companies from using quotes from foreign media sources and information garnered from Weibo, the country’s popular microblogging website. Citing the need to “form a healthy reporting structure,” among other reasons, authorities are preparing to lay out strict reporting regulations

The General Administration of Press and Publication (GAPP) and the State Administration of Radio, Film and Television (SARFT), state authorities that control domestic media, made it clear they will start “requesting reporters and editors” not to use reports from foreign media sources or citizen-generated content from the Internet without first gaining prior approval.

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China Now Hiring “Chief Pornographic Identification Officer”, Benefits Include Fruit, Yogurt

The illegal posting of adult content on the internet is a huge problem for producers, and even for China — a country that maintains remarkably strict standards regarding adult content — it’s near impossible to regulate. Like a whack-a-mole game (especially this one) infinite in scope, when one site is shut down another one pops up right away.

To stem this trend a security company is looking for one brave soul with can sail out into the vast sea of information on the net and locate websites hosting adult content.

That’s right: they want to pay someone to look for pornographic websites – what many of you are probably doing right now, but for cash.

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World Objects to Okuizumo’s Objection to Michelangelo’s David, “That Anime They Put Out Is OK, but David Isn’t?!”

Since its creation five centuries ago at the hands of master sculptor Michelangelo, David has been ruffling feathers everywhere it goes in the world. Although David stands proudly among the masterpieces of fine art, some complain he’s being a little too proud.

The latest call for size XXXXXL underpants comes from some residents in the town of Okuizumo in Shimane Prefecture. According to Yomiuri Shinbun, numerous complaints have been coming in to the effect of “education and nudity don’t mix.”

As a result, the small town has been put under an international spotlight in the endless debate of David’s Doodad.

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