disaster

Huge fire breaks out at Tokyo’s world-famous Tsukiji Fish Market【Videos, photos】

Flames spread through the world’s most famous place to eat raw fish.

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U.S.-Japan release collaborative video of support one year after Kumamoto earthquakes【Video】

On the Road to Recovery: The People of America and Kumamoto Join Together is a beautiful clip that encourages the people of Kumamoto to be positive during recovery efforts.

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Chilling Tokyo skyscraper sign shows just how tall the 2011 Japanese tsunami was

Numbers alone can be hard to visualize, but this makes things terrifyingly easy to understand.

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Typhoon Lionrock delays production of Calbee potato chips

Typhoon Lionrock has destroyed this month’s special range of Calbee potato chips.

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Kitty door placards from Japan don’t just look cute, they could save your pet’s life

Magnetic notices convey a very important message about your cats for when you’re not there to speak for them.

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Messages of support from Taiwan warm the hearts of Kumamoto earthquake victims

Messagess of support, this time from Taiwan, keep pouring in following the deadly earthquake in Kumamoto.

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From box to bed: This simple item is making life easier for Kumamoto earthquake victims

With the ability to withstand the weight of up to 20 people, this bed doesn’t mess around!

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Volunteer craftsman traveling to Kumamoto to repair earthquake-damaged family heirloom ceramics

Plans to use traditional Japanese kintsugi techniques to make them look as good as new, or perhaps even better.

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Two of Japan’s biggest chains travel to disaster-stricken Kumamoto to hand out free beef bowls

Mobile kitchens provide comfort food, in the truest sense of the word, for thousands of earthquake victims.

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Violent winds pound Tokyo, topple mid-construction nine-story building 【Video】

Passersby witness frightening scene as it happens.

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Four years after nuclear incident, chilling Fukushima photos show healing is still not complete

In 2008, Polish photographer Arkadiusz Podniesinski travelled to Chernobl for the first time to document the aftermath of the Ukranian nuclear disaster. He would return multiple times, filming two documentaies in the process.

With more than 20 years having passed since the Chernobl incident and Podniesinski’s first trip to the site, the tragedy must have seemed like a relic of the past, but then came the 2011 tsunami that struck Japan and the subsequent Fukushima nuclear crisis. More than four years later, access to much of Fukushima is still restricted due to dangerous amounts of radiation, but Podniesinski recently traveled to the affected area and brought back haunting images that drive home how abruptly the end of life as residents knew it came, and how many sings of the devastation still remain.

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Single “Hebel Haus” is the only structure to defy the flooding of Japan’s Angry Demon River

Last week, we discussed the possible etymology of Kinugawa (“Angry Demon River”), which has been the scene of intense flooding in eastern Japan this month. While the overflowing river has devastated the surrounding towns and landscapes in its wake, a single building in Joso City, Ibaraki Prefecture has been gaining particular attention for being the only structure within sight to stand firmly in place in the face of a deluge of muddy water.

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Drones capture shocking footage of flooding in Ibaraki, Japan【Video】

When disaster zones are inaccessible by ground—such as the areas of Japan hit by widespread and deadly flooding last week—news broadcasters typically take to the air, relaying footage from helicopters. In the city of Joso, Ibaraki, news helicopters captured dramatic footage of rescue teams winching people to safety from rooftops on Thursday after the Kinugawa River burst its banks.

But helicopters can only get so close, and so authorities in Japan are now using drones to capture footage in disaster areas. The drones can fly closer to disaster-hit areas than a manned helicopter, offering a different and dramatic perspective.

And drones are not only being used to survey these areas hit by flooding and landslides; they are also starting to be used in rescue missions.

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Taxi driver drove for free during the aftermath of Tianjin explosions, carried evacuees to safety

On August 13, China was shaken by massive explosions which occurred at a port warehouse in Tianjin. The powerful blasts claimed over a hundred lives, left hundreds injured, and the impact affected residents within several kilometers of the port.

Many affected individuals have been trying to evacuate in the aftermath of the disastrous incident, but with parts of the public transportation network affected, things don’t always go as planned. However, some selfless taxi drivers were reportedly picking up passengers from the affected areas and taking them to safety without charging a single cent, drawing a silver lining amidst the dark clouds of smoke rising from the ruins of the explosion.

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Tweet all the things! Japanese vs American reactions to earthquakes

You might have heard that we experienced a magnitude-5.6 earthquake last week, which got everyone in the area a little shaken up (except for this super chill gorilla, of course). While Japan experiences earthquakes incredibly frequently, this one was a little bigger than usual, and had many in Japan diving for cover.

Oh, no, wait, they dived for their smartphones instead…

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Rescued dog becomes rescue dog as Hiroshima stray joins search for survivors in Nepal

In the wake of the massive earthquake that struck central Nepal last week, non-profit organisation Peace Winds Japan sent a small team of six rescuers and two specially trained dogs to help with the search for survivors.

Remarkably, one of the search dogs who was dispatched to Kathmandu is himself a former rescue: Yumenosuke, a stray dog saved from euthanasia in Hiroshima.

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Don’t forget: Yahoo! Japan to make disaster relief donation for every person who searches for “3.11” today

Four years on, the earthquake, tsunami, and nuclear crisis that befell Japan’s Tohoku region on March 11, 2011 have very little effect on the day-to-day lives of most people in the country. The rolling blackouts have stopped. Batteries and bottled water are once again readily available. Trains are running, and whole cities aren’t spending hours walking home from work or school.

But while a return to normalcy is a desirable, and ultimately necessary, part of recovery, it’s also important to remember what happened. To stem the forgetfulness that often accompanies the later stages of coping with tragedy, on March 11 Yahoo! Japan will be making a donation to the Tohoku recovery efforts for every person that searches for “3.11” through the company’s search engine.

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Japan Ministry of Defense develops tiny, grenade-shaped remote surveillance robot

The Japanese Ministry of Defense’s Technical Research & Development Institute (TRDI) appears to be nearing completion of the Throwable Type Reconnaissance Robot. It’s a little black orb about 50 percent bigger than a softball that Self-Defense Force members can simply toss into environments otherwise hazardous to humans and have a look around before taking action. It looks kind of awesome.

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Japanese politicians propose officially designating March 11 as Great East Japan Disaster Day

This coming spring will mark four years since the devastating earthquake and tsunami that struck Japan on March 11, 2011. While that’s not nearly long enough for the those who experienced the tragedy first-hand to forget about the destruction, sadness, and fear, some politicians are concerned that in time memories will fade, which is why a bill is being introduced in the Japanese Diet to establish March 11 as an official day of remembrance of the disaster.

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New Japanese battery only needs water to power up smartphones in a disaster

Sitting on several fault lines, Japan is no stranger to natural disasters and the havoc that ensues afterward. While these tragedies can’t be prevented, their effects can be lessened by making a disaster preparedness kit to handle several days without power or access to food and water.

A key item in these kits is usually batteries, and a Japanese company’s recent announcement about a new kind of battery is expected to completely change the way we prepare for disasters. Only needing to be filled with water, the “Mg Box” battery can be used to charge smartphones, and the invention has made the Japanese company’s stock skyrocket as investors rush to back the game-changing technology.

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