employment

Are you a female cyborg with IT skills? Japan’s police might want you!

Are you a female cyborg with IT skills? Japan’s police might want you!

Law enforcement continues to be a popular career choice in Japan. Outside of the obvious risks involved it’s a stable job compared to the corporate rat race. However, people who are simply interested in job security often aren’t the ideal candidates to become police officers. Incidence of resignation is on the rise in the forces across Japan, with disgruntled men and women alike citing “being tired of chasing people” and “scary” crime scenes as reasons for leaving.

Combine this with the impending mass retirement of the baby boom generation, and police are facing a significant human resources crisis in the near future. So they have recently been looking at new ways to hook new, and more importantly the right kind of, candidates.

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60 percent of young, “irregular workers” in Japan want a do-over

60 percent of young, “irregular workers” in Japan want a do-over

“I hate this job.” Not exactly uncommon words, are they? While you may not necessarily love the work you do, it’s always nice to at least not hate your job, right? Unfortunately, it seems that all too many of us are stuck in life-draining professions, wishing we could start all over. And, it turns out, over half of young “irregular” Japanese workers can sympathize.

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Kuzya the cat assigned to assistant librarian position in Novorossiysk, Russia

Kuzya the cat assigned to assistant librarian position in Novorossiysk, Russia

Cats often get a bad rep for being lazy and selfish, but in fact they can back it up with a stellar job performance when necessary. For example, I once saw a cat swat and eat a cockroach in mid-flight. According to various industry insiders, employers hate cockroaches. Now that’s a valuable skill to add to any organization!

This is a fact of life that no one knows better than Russia. Their State Hermitage Museum is staffed by a team of cats who protect its treasures from vermin around the clock – or the sections of the clock they’re awake.

Even on the local level we now have Kuzya the tabby who is swiftly making his way up the ladder at a Novorossiysk Library. Coming straight off the streets he has already assumed the role of assistant librarian, and many are tipping him to be running the whole facility before long.

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South Korean media alarmed as study shows 1 in 5 young people is NEET

South Korean media alarmed as study shows 1 in 5 young people is NEET

On 20 May the International Labor Organization (ILO) released their Global Employment Trends for Youth 2013 report which outlines the employment environment for people aged 15 to 29 in nations around the world.

Among the statistic were NEET rates among 34 OECD countries’ young people. A NEET (Not in Education, Employment, or Training) rate is the percentage of youth who are not working or in school of any kind.

On average, 15.8 percent of tens and young adults fall in this category in developed countries. The following is a full list of the studied countries.

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Got Three Months to Spare? Why Not Make Big Bucks Doing Manual Labor in Fukushima Disaster Site?

Got Three Months to Spare? Why Not Make Big Bucks Doing Manual Labor in Fukushima Disaster Site?

If you’re living in Japan and find yourself recently unemployed or facing an extended vacation you’re in luck!

That’s right. Currently there is a job offer for work inside the nuclear power plant of sunny Okuma, Fukushima, home to the Fukushima Daiichi reactor.

Now, before you tell me to go screw myself, they’re offering 30,000 to 50,000 yen (US$319-531) per day for three months. Let’s take a look at the offer in full.

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Survey About Employees’ “Ideal Boss” Highlights Major Differences Between Japanese and Chinese Thinking

Survey About Employees’ “Ideal Boss” Highlights Major Differences Between Japanese and Chinese Thinking

Bitching about our bosses is probably one of the best things about socialising with coworkers. They’re to strict; they’re a push-over; they have coffee breath and get way too close when they talk; whatever the issue, complaining about the boss is a great stress reliever and helps us get through the day.

According to a recent survey taken across four countries, however, expectations of bosses and opinions of what makes a good one vary wildly between countries. Not only that, Japan ranks as the country with the lowest “boss satisfaction” rate of all those surveyed.

Of course, my boss is the greatest, and I would never even dream of saying a bad word about him <cough>Christmasbonus<cough>, but the difference between the opinions of those surveyed in Japan and those in other countries, most notably China, is startling.

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Looking for Work Fellas? How about a Job Where You’re Always Surrounded by Women? Nursing!

Looking for Work Fellas? How about a Job Where You’re Always Surrounded by Women? Nursing!

As the global recession trudges along, unemployment rates remain high leaving many young men laid off or graduating without job prospects. Luckily a new avenue of employment for men has opened up in Japan.

Up until not long ago, nursing in Japan was exclusively done by women. Even as more and more women took on careers as doctors, the idea of a man being a nurse was about as absurd as a cow being one. However, nowadays more and more Japanese men are beginning to follow in the footsteps of Florence Nightingale.

So what are the pros and cons of becoming a male nurse?

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Radical Japanese Company Advertises Jobs Online: “We do not employ smokers”

Radical Japanese Company Advertises Jobs Online: “We do not employ smokers”

As public perception of smoking becomes increasingly negative, and with the number of smoking areas in restaurants and cafes in Japan becoming fewer and fewer each year, it’s fair to say that those little white sticks that once brought so much pleasure to so many are perhaps on their way out.

As people find themselves becoming more and more irritated by cigarette smoke as they walk though crowded streets, and residents grow sick of sweeping up discarded cigarette butts in their neighbourhoods, smoking anywhere outside of specially designated kitsuen (smoking) zones has become a punishable offence in many urban areas of Japan.

The times, they are a-changing.

But even with so many turning their backs of tobacco and labelling it as un-cool, few could have predicted that a company as large as Hoshino Resorts would actively advertise the fact that they no longer accept job applications from smokers.

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