Math-solving phone app is the quickest way to self-study, skip homework, and/or fail your tests

I think we can all agree that math is a pretty handy thing to understand, right? A basic concept of things like fractions and algebraic equivalents is what keeps us from getting taken advantage of by con men who make such tempting offers as trading two of their shiny monies (or even three!) for our one paper money when the latter is actually of greater value.

Still, basic math is all about following the proper procedures to arrive at the one true solution, which is why you don’t get partial credit for having the wrong answer on your math assignment just because you took a novel approach and wrote the numbers with nice penmanship. As such, you can program a machine to spit out the answer in a fraction of a second, and with a new smartphone app, all you have to do is snap a picture of the math problem, and let the app take over from there.

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Mysterious Japanese publishing group releases book with pi to one million places

The world is full of mysteries, from why anyone thought recreating emoji in real life was a good idea to what the heck is going on at Fushimi Inari Shrine. Another mystery is what all the digits of pi are. Since the number just goes on and on forever, it’s a mystery that will never — can never — be solved.

However, we have figured out a huge amount of pi — to trillions of digits, in fact! And you can even buy a book with the first one million digits in Japan thanks to the Dark Communications Group, which is not a group of mad mathematicians plotting to take over the world.

We hope.

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Japanese Twitter claims that if you can answer this question, you have an IQ of 150+

So you’ve memorized thousands of kanji, you can name all the members of AKB48, and you actually understand the ending to Evangelion. You’re probably pretty smart, but are you smart enough to take down a question from Japanese Twitter?

Japanese Twitter user @yabazin_gazou, an account with over 250,000 followers, recently posted an unusual math problem, claiming that if you could solve it, that would prove you have an IQ of 150 or higher. While we’re not exactly sure on the science behind that claim, check it out to test the overlap between your math and creativity skills.

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How do you divide? Intriguing models of long-division problems from around the world

Love it or hate it, long-division is a necessary and practical skill to learn. While I certainly don’t use any of my high school calculus in daily life nowadays, I do occasionally whip out a pen and paper to calculate how many cat sushi figures I can buy for my yen’s worth, for instance.

Recently, our minds were blown when we stumbled across a picture that illustrates the ways that people in different countries calculate long-division problems. Which style were you taught to use in school?

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The little test that’s blowing Japanese netizens’ minds

While many Japanese people might not get “American jokes,” they do seem to be enjoying some certain English memes. For example, “The Little Test That Blows Your Mind,” which recently reappeared online, was translated and posted to a Japanese website, garnering over 1,500 comments.

If you’ve already taken the test, you’ll definitely want to see how your answer stacks up against these Japanese commenters. And if you haven’t taken the test yet, be sure to give it a try!

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Japanese elementary school teachers may tell you “5 x 100 = 500” is wrong

Here’s an elementary school math question for you all:
Apples are sold for 100 yen each. If you buy 5 what is the total amount?

If you said “5 × 100 = 500” then I’m sorry but you just flunked second grade math in Japan… if there were only one question all year.

The reason is an old teaching method that is employed in elementary and middle schools throughout the country. It’s also a method that many, such as a blogger by the name of Uncorrelated, want stopped as it leads to strange logic where six times seven does not always equal 42 and five times 100 might not equal 500.

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Sexual Mathematics: How Many Men in China will Die Virgins?

Ready to have some fun with numbers? Yeah, we thought as much!

Japan’s News Post Seven recently ran an article claiming that, based on various sets of statistics, 100 million men in China will go through their entire lives without having sex. Let’s go through it and see if they deserve a Nobel Prize or a kick in the pants.

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Tokyo University Makes Calculator Using Robot, What It Lacks in Usefulness It Makes Up for in Cuteness

Japan is well known for both its love and skill of robots.  Free of the terminator-induced prejudices of western cultures, they have blazed the way for robotic tour guides, waitresses, fish, singers, hairdressers, waste baskets, cyclists, rock-paper-scissors players, cockroaches, butts

With so many robots, it’s hard to come up with an original one.  But they are still out there. Tokyo University’s Center for the Study of Robotics came up with Denta-kun, the calculator using robot.  Just to make it clear, the robot does not calculate. It just uses a calculator.

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A Shoo-In Method For Cheating on Your Math Test

When I was in high school, the TI-82 graphing calculator was the cheater’s tool of choice. At first we would simply store important equations into the “Y=” graphing screen. After teachers caught onto that, we figured out that you could register data to the calculator’s memory and restore it with the push of a button.

I imagine that schools today must be on complete technology lockdown, but where there’s a will there’s a way. Just take a look at this novel, low-tech cheating method devised by one student in China that’s sure to knock you off your feet.

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