motherhood

Japanese artist shows what motherhood is really like with hilarious illustrated series

This artist perfectly captures all the joy and hardship that comes with being a new mum.

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Emotional video explores the gap between ideals and reality for working mothers in Japan【Video】

Get out the tissues because this short ad will make you appreciate family bonds all over again.

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Try not to cry at this series of short films showing struggles working mothers face in Japan

In Japan, it’s still considered quite normal for women to give up their jobs once they get married and focus on running the home and raising children. Not only is motherhood a respected career in itself, there really isn’t enough support for working mothers, making returning to work a prospect many women don’t aspire to.

And, as this new series of videos shows, working mothers who are also married often don’t get enough support from their spouse or co-workers. We challenge you not to tear up just a tiny bit at this video depicting the struggles of a hard-working mother whose sick child asks her “Mommy, are you okay?”

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Mama cat’s breastfeeding pose perfectly encapsulates stress of new motherhood

I don’t have kids myself, but I’m at an age when a lot of people around me are having their first child. Boy, does it look stressful!

Even something as natural as breastfeeding brings up a whole host of worries. Am I making enough milk? Is he latching on correctly? Am I nursing too much? Not enough? Am I eating the right foods? Why won’t he stop crying?!

It’s enough to make a new mother want to cry herself, but perhaps they can find comfort in the idea that maybe other species get overwhelmed too.

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5 powerful reasons to be a woman in Japan 【Women in Japan Series】

It’s no secret that Japan continually lands at the bottom in global gender gap reports. In 2012, the World Economic Forum ranked Japan 101 in regard to women’s participation in the economy and politics. In 2013, Japan placed 105 (out of 135 countries), putting it behind Burkina Faso in gender equality.

Based on these findings, you may think it doesn’t seem like Japan is a very good country for women, but you’d be wrong. While there are huge shortcomings in gender gaps in the workplace, economy and politics, in other sectors of Japanese society some would would argue that Japanese women have “too much” power.

Let’s take a look at five areas where women are most powerful in Japan.

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