Siri

How Microsoft created a virtual assistant that could blow Siri away

YouTube/calloftreyarch

Windows Phone is still a distant third to Apple and Android in the smartphone market, but Microsoft is hoping to change that with the introduction of Windows Phone 8.1— and more importantly its personal digital assistant Cortana.

Microsoft claims that Cortana isn’t like your average virtual assistant. She’s supposed to be a little wittier, more personable, and capable of learning more about you than Siri or Google Now.

After using Cortana for a week and speaking with Microsoft’s Marcus Ash, Partner Group program manager, it’s clear that the company’s got a lot riding on the success of its new virtual assistant.

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【Thursday Throwback】Siri does not understand my English, kicks my confidence in the nuts

The iPhone4S finally arrived in Japan today, and thousands of people lined up outside their local Softbank or AU store, eager to get their hands on the phone when it hit the shelves at 8 am.

The most appealing new function of the iPhone4S for many people is the integrated voice interface, Siri. Apple claims that Siri enables you to easily send messages, check the weather, schedule meetings, and take care of a number of other traditionally text-based tasks just by using your voice.

Though it is currently not compatible with Japanese, the program is still available for use on Japanese iPhones. I made my way to an Apple Store to see if Siri would respond to my heavily-accented English but I had no luck. In fact, my broken attempts to inquire about the weather in English were interpreted so far off that I couldn’t help laughing.

Take a look at my techno-lingual struggle below.

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Japanese artists dream up a cartoon version of Apple’s Siri

We’re all familiar with Apple’s module for voice commands, Siri. Available with Apple mobile devices, which are sold in 14 different countries, Siri is well-known around the world. But things start to get interesting when Siri is used in a language other than its original English.

When said in Japanese, Siri turns into Shiri, which is just one letter off from “Oshiri,” the Japanese word for “butt.” With a name like that, you can imagine what asset the illustrators of the Internet chose to accentuate when drawing the personification of Apple’s personal assistant and knowledge navigator. Just be warned, you might be embarrassed to look at some of these images at work.

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Looking for a cheap scare? Tell Japanese Siri you want to die

Apple’s virtual assistant Siri can be a lot of fun when you have free time and the battery power to spare. You could flirt with her, ask her trivia questions, or find the best place to hide a dead body.

For one Japanese Twitter user, however, a fun chat with Siri got really dark really quick. In their words: “I was screwing around with Siri and I randomly said ‘I want to die.’ Her answer was so unexpected that I put the chain lock on my door at the speed of sound.”

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Siri Puts the “Ass” Back into Personal Assistant with Her Japanese Record Debut

Japanese independent musicians IOSYS (ee-oh-she-su) have a treat in store for us this Christmas.  They created a concept album titled Teach me Shiri Sensei! starring everyone’s favorite virtual assistant who only knows what you’re saying half of the time, Siri.

You might be wondering from the image above why anthropomorphic moé Siri (yes, that’s her) has a severe case of plumber’s crack. It’s not just pervy for the sake of being pervy. In Japanese, there isn’t really a “see/si” sound. Instead, it’s a “she” sound.

First, this can make it very funny when a Japanese person asks “May I take a seat?” Second, this changes the pronunciation of Siri to “Shiri”, which is the Japanese word for “buttocks.”  This word play is a major theme in the album.

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A Year After Launch, iPhone’s Siri Still Packs a Few Surprises, But Remains a Slave to Her Bosses

While there are still a few kinks to be straightened out, and it’s not quite the life-changing service that Apple have been claiming it to be, the iPhone’s PA program Siri is still capable of making a few users chuckle.

Perhaps just seeing what their new iPhone’s electronic assistant could do can do, or perhaps just immensely bored one day, a Japanese iPhone user told Siri something about herself–

“Tomorrow’s my birthday…”

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Siri Reluctantly Tells Us a Story, We Can’t Tell if She’s Cynical of Full of Herself

The iPhone4S continues to see strong sales since its October launch, and we imagine that means many of you native English speakers are enjoying the company of Apple’s voice-controlled assistant app Siri, likely with better luck than we had.

While the main purpose of Siri is to save time and help organize, she was also programmed to respond to a variety of unique questions with a variety of unique answers.

For example, we recently found that Siri has a few things to say when you present her with the request, “Tell me a story.”

When we first made the request, Siri reservedly insisted that she can’t tell stories, that she’s “not a storyteller.” However, after repeating the request several times she finally caved in and began to recount to us her own, glorified personal history. Read More

Siri Does Not Recognize English, Leads To Loss Of Self-Confidence

The iPhone4S finally arrived in Japan today, and thousands of people lined up outside their local Softbank or AU store, eager to get their hands on the phone when it hit the shelves at 8 am.

The most appealing new function of the iPhone4S for many people is the integrated voice interface, Siri. Apple claims that Siri enables you to easily send messages, check the weather, schedule meetings, and take care of a number of other traditionally text-based tasks just by using your voice.

Though it is currently not compatible with Japanese, the program is still available for use on Japanese iPhones. I made my way to an Apple Store to see if Siri would respond to my heavily-accented English but I had no luck. In fact, my broken attempts to inquire about the weather in English were interpreted so far off that I couldn’t help laughing.

Take a look at my techno-lingual struggle below. Read More

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