tempura

Seven diet-sabotaging Japanese foods to avoid…or seek out!

Despite its healthy holier-than-thou image, Japanese food has more than a few calorific goodies/evil temptations.

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Japan’s clam chowder tempura is jiggly and crazy, but how does it taste? We find out

We imagined that this would be either amazingly good or excruciatingly bad, and we were right.

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Udon chain’s awesome “Tempura Pass” deal works out to less than 10 yen per piece over five weeks

Prepaid tempura plan is totally the way to go, and even lets you choose fried chicken if that’s what your heart desires.

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Clam chowder tempura being offered by Japan’s most popular tempura restaurant chain

Tenya buries the lede (under other types of tempura) in its new “Bacon Chicken Tempura Bowl.”

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Five times our Japanese-language reporters added 85 bucks of “extras” to food orders in 2016

Taking “all you can eat” to new and obnoxiously disgusting heights in 2016.

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Laze about the house like a piece of tempura with the Fried Prawn Wearable Sleeping Bag!

Whether you’re looking for an unusual Halloween costume or a cosy outfit to snuggle up in, this crazy bread-crumbed number will make all your fried food fantasies come true!

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Waste not, want not: Japanese netizens share delicious ways they prepare watermelon rinds

If you thought the red flesh was the only edible part of a watermelon, this is for you!

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Cheapo News: Dine on a great-tasting tempura rice bowl for just 130 yen at this Tokyo chain

Marugame Udon, a ubiquitous Tokyo noodle shop, serves this delicious “hidden” menu item for just 130 yen.

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Here’s what happens when you order US$80 worth of extra shrimp for your tempura bowl in Tokyo

Is it possible to have too many tempura shrimp? No, of course not. Don’t be silly.

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Who needs fast food? Tokyo tempura totaling less than 10 bucks

Here at RocketNews24, two of the things we love most are delicious foods in our bellies and cash in our wallets. Unfortunately, those two things don’t always go hand-in-hand, especially in the Michelin star-studded culinary landscape of Tokyo.

But in a city as big as Tokyo, you can find just about anything with a little searching. Even if you’re totally bereft of folding money, you can still get a great meal in Japan’s capital, and you don’t have to settle for eating at a fast food chain either. On the menu today: a nine-piece tempura meal in the heart of Tokyo for less than 1,000 yen (US$8).

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10 distinctly Japanese comfort foods

Comfort food” is traditional cooking that tends to have a nostalgic or sentimental connection, often one related to family or childhood: the grilled cheese sandwiches your mother used to make; the thought of your grandmother’s bread pudding makes your mouth water; the way the whole house would be filled with the intoxicating aroma of roasted turkey or ham at Christmas? Because of such memories, these foods comfort us, especially when we’re longing for home or feeling especially vulnerable.

Not surprisingly, the sentimental Japanese have their own comfort foods. While you might think they’d be waxing over the octopus tentacles of home, very few of the dishes we’re about to talk about have much to do with seafood. Many Japanese comfort foods have a rice connection and may even center around the unique relationship between mothers or wives and their role in family food preparation. And in Japan, make no mistake about it–her kitchen rules!

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We leap into autumn by eating a pack of tempura maple leaves

Earlier this month, we found out that the city of Mino, in Osaka, has been selling tempura maple leaves for at least a hundred years. Since we’ve made it our mission in life to eat everything that can be deep-fried (barring non-food items like deep-fried scissors), we immediately called Hisakuni Kosendo, one Mino’s maple-cooking outfits, and ordered a pack to try for ourselves.

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Think you’ve had every type of tempura? Not until you’ve eaten deep-fried maple leaves

Autumn is a great time of year in Japan. The sticky humidity of summer is gone, but it’s still warm enough to enjoy spending time outdoors. Best of all, there’s the spectacular show of the leaves changing to vivid reds and dazzling yellows.

For me though, fall comes with one major drawback, which is that for the whole season, it seems like the mixed tempura set at every restaurant I go to is packed with mushrooms. If you’re a fan of Japan’s many types of edible fungi, this is a major plus, but if you can’t stand the things, you might be feeling a little left-out.

Take heart, though, because there’s still a way to form a deep-fried connection to autumn with tempura maple leaves.

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Tempura, anyone? Prank at sushi chain involving deep-fried scissors lands part-timers in hot oil

In 2013, Japan saw a meteoric rise in internet photos that depict part-time workers’ silly and sometimes idiotic antics while on the clock (remember the freezer diving phenomenon?). Though the term “bakattā” (a portmanteau word that’s not restricted to part-timers and combines baka, or idiot, and tsuittaa, the Japanese pronunciation of Twitter) was coined back in 2010, it gained even more popularity last year and took fourth place in the 2013 Internet Buzzword Awards, sponsored by the Tokyo company Mirai Kensaku Brazil.

The craze of bragging about law-breaking or idiotic behavior on social networking sites has thankfully died down, partly due to publicization of the serious repercussions faced by some perpetrators. However, it seems like a couple of young guys working at a major revolving sushi chain had not been watching the news, or were looking to get fired: a photo uploaded on the evening of September 24 with a Tweet that said, “I invented a new menu item with [name deleted] today! Lololol” spread like wildfire, only to reach the head of the company by the following morning. D’oh!

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Tokyo’s sushi spirit shrine, where the souls of seafood slumber

The other day, I woke up and immediately had a craving for sushi. In and of itself, that’s not really anything remarkable, since “Man, I could really go for some good sushi,” is one of my first fully formed thoughts on just about any given morning.

Not one to deny my heart its truest desires, I headed to Tokyo’s Tsukiji, home of the world’s biggest seafood market and some of Japan’s best sushi restaurants. I ducked into one and polished off a bowl of sliced tuna and salmon, and, still wrapped in the lingering effects of my food coma, went for a rambling stroll around the neighborhood.

Since I wasn’t looking for food anymore, my eyes ended up being drawn to a shrine I’d never noticed before. I stepped onto the grounds, where I found a monument to the souls of all the fish whose lives supply Japan with sushi.

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Sister makes tempura out of her little brother’s Gundam figure

Ideally, having a sibling would be great because you always have someone to play with. But most of the time, your brother or sister is a fountain of endless torment and grief. Take this sister for example. She posted the picture above with the caption, “I battered up and fried my little brother’s precious Gundam.” Yeah, siblings are the worst.

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Fried shark toys: An interesting twist on tempura

What will they think of next? From Japanese toy company, Takara Tomy, makers of an indoor kite and robotic tropical fish, comes a fried shark toy that looks good enough to politely refuse to eat.

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Tokyo restaurant staying one step ahead of big eaters with its continually growing tempura bowl

A while back, we paid a visit to Fukugawa Tsuribune, a restaurant in Tokyo’s Kunitachi City famous for its fried foods and tempura. We engaged in a delicious battle with its gigantic tempura sea eel rice bowl, coming away victorious but full to bursting.

But believe it or not, that actually wasn’t the most colossal offering on Fukugawa Tsuribune’s menu, which is home to an even more terrifying titan of a meal.

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Giant sea eel: fearsome monster or delicious lunch?

The restaurant Fukugawa Tsuribune is famous for tempura, especially its anago don, tempura saltwater eel served over a bowl of rice. The restaurant’s version of this Japanese standard draws fans from all over the Tokyo area to its location 35 minutes by train west of downtown.

Needless to say, the restaurant must be doing something right, and once we heard the rumors that the anago portions are extremely generous, we couldn’t keep ourselves away and made the trip out to the restaurant to try it for ourselves.

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Tasty, Easy, Quick and Affordable! Mos Burger Lets You Eat Tempura and Rice with One Hand

Yes, we Japanese love tempura, and it’s also one of the better known Japanese foods around the world. If you’re a fan of the dish, I’m sure just thinking about the light, crispy batter and the sweet flavorful sauce is enough to make your mouth water. What’s more, tempura in Japan can be enjoyed as haute cuisine at high-end restaurants like Tenichi (where a full course dinner might cost you between US$100 and $300), or a completely casual yet tasty meal at joints like Tenya, where a very decent tendon (tempura on rice) costs about $5 to $8.

Now, popular Japanese fast food chain Mos Burger makes tempura even more accessible to the average consumer by offering special tempura based rice burgers for a limited time. Read More