work

Japanese company bans employees from sitting down while using computers for productivity, health

Workers may want to stretch out their hamstrings as they warm up their typing fingers.

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Woman robs own convenience store, becomes the greatest “bakkura” of all

Let’s take this rare sighting of an S-Class bakkura to learn a little about what being a bakkura is all about.

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Bra shirt for men: Japan develops new type of clothing to conceal men’s nipples

This new garment uses a specially designed insert to help cover those pesky high beams.

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Japanese university students reveal the part-time jobs they’d most like to have

The top ten results show which companies appeal most to young students.

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Net user shares clever discovery to make her boss feel concerned and let her go home early

This worker discovered a surprising trick which makes use of only one simple object for a potentially epic lifehack. 

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Mr. Sato installs a cardboard toilet in his workspace for maximum efficiency

Mr. Sato overcomes his greatest foe in the battle for time: his own bowels.

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Fukuoka City aims to resume traffic at site of road collapse less than a week after accident

Following days of around-the-clock work by construction workers, all eyes are on the city again following reports that the road will be fit to drive on by today.

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Japanese ladies list top five companies whose employees they’d most/least like to date

Which company in Japan has the most and least “eligible bachelor” employees? New study suggests Japanese ladies have strict preferences!
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34 percent of Japanese men are afraid of their female colleagues, according to recent poll

The reasons they give will make you think twice about the way men and women act in the workplace.

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Hard-working Hokkaido sheep become internet sensations thanks to their…employment contract?!

It’s enough to make you quit your job and take up grass munching full time!

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“My dad is less useful than our Roomba”—Japanese 5th-grader’s brutal honesty on family in Japan

If your child has a better relationship with the robotic vacuum cleaner than with you, then you might have a problem.

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McDonald’s recruitment ad paints a grim picture of life in Japan

Work part time for McDonald’s Japan and join the ranks of housewives, students, and Y-san: the saddest person you’ll ever meet.
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Nearly one in four Japanese adults admits to crying in the office bathroom in new survey

Heading to the office in Japan? Don’t forget your bento boxed lunch…and your tissues.

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We talk to a real Japanese butler about life as the chief of staff of a household【SoraInterview】

Full-time butlers are pretty hard to come by these days, so when we had the chance to meet one such professional in Japan, we leapt on the chance to ask him a bunch of questions to ask about his role—like how come they don’t wear coattails anymore?

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Survey shows most Japanese employees don’t like Western-style work socials

With December less than two weeks away, Japanese companies are beginning to make preparations for their annual bounenkai (end-of-year) and shinnenkai (New Year) parties. Even if they’re the kind of people who sometimes duck out on after-work drinks with the boss, most Japanese employees are painfully aware that skipping the biggest corporate celebrations of the year is tantamount to career suicide.

Because large-scale events usually require more space than your average drinking party, many Japanese companies have recently been moving away from typical sit-down enkai banquets and are holding more Western-style events where staff are encouraged to move around freely and interact over a few drinks.

But according to a recent survey, these Western-style work socials are overwhelmingly unpopular in Japan. Here are the top seven reasons why.

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Meetings and more meetings: Foreigners list the pros and cons of working at a Japanese company

It’s no secret that Japan may be headed for a bit of a labor crunch, as the population ages and many older workers reach retirement age with fewer young up-and-comers to replace them. And, while the Japanese government seems reluctant to take measures to replenish the shrinking workforce with foreign laborers, non-Japanese workers are nevertheless entering Japanese corporations and workplaces in record numbers.

But Japanese offices are also notorious for their long hours, slow pace of advancement, and frequent, long meetings. Traditional Japanese companies seem stuck in an old-school work culture even as companies in the rest of the world offer increasingly progressive work-life balance programs, workplace perks, and office hours.

With this stark contrast in mind, our Japanese sister site tracked down seven non-Japanese workers to get their for-realsies impressions of what it’s actually like to work at a Japanese company.

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Chinese employees publicly thank their boss for giving them work

When was the last time you thanked your teachers for giving you homework or your boss for piling on the work? Probably never, right? A group of employees in China did something crazy last week, publicly thanking their higher-ups for giving them work.

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5 discriminatory interview questions employers in Japan are no longer allowed to ask

For many young people in Japan, August means summer vacation, festivals and free time. For fourth-year university students however, it means time to start interviewing for jobs. The job-hunting process in Japan is long, grueling and very systematic, culminating in interview after interview for the jobless, soon-to-graduate, young adults.

Interviews can be nerve-wracking for even the most experienced candidates, but Japanese companies don’t always ask the most predictable questions. In fact, some of their questions can be downright weird. Many of these oddball interview questions, however, may not actually be legal.

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7-Eleven store manager writes the most sincere, desperate job ad we’ve ever seen

If you are unemployed and living in Japan, we may have found a perfect job for you. No experience is necessary, it’s a pretty safe gig and you won’t have to do anything too difficult. You will, however, be a savior, a hero, and a knight in shining armor for one overworked, stressed-out, and understaffed, 7-Eleven store manager in Tokyo.

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Sociologist says high school hierarchy keeps Japanese adults away from their home towns

Ijime, or bullying, is sadly as much a part of Japanese school life as it is in any other country. In Japan, too, each school has a sort of social hierarchy, where the “cool kids” often pick on or exclude the nerdy/unsporty kids, and everyone gets shuffled around until the “stronger” kids are on the top and the “weaker” kids are on the bottom.

But in a society like Japan, where group mentality is so important, you’d be mistaken for thinking that after high school everyone just flutters off to become their own special snowflake and cast off the mental wounds of a tough adolescence.

In other words, if someone was bullied in school, there’s a chance they’ll keep on being bullied by the same people right on through their working days if they stay in the same town. So how does this “high school hierarchy” continue to affect the lives of adults in Japan?

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