sushijiro-005

One of Japan’s most delectable specialties is sushi. While there are still people out there who can’t even imagine eating the delicacy, much of the world has been overtaken with a sushi storm.

The only bad thing about sushi is that it can be a little on the pricey side. One New Zealand company, however, is ready to aid you in saving money by helping you make sushi at home with their easy to use Sushi Bazooka.

For those people unaccustomed to making makizushi, or rolled sushi, like California Rolls, it can seem like a pretty daunting task with all of those ingredients and bamboo mats. Even those who know how to do it aren’t necessarily very good at it.

▼ Here’s the traditional way to make makizushi.

Really, it doesn’t seem that hard, but hey, why not make it easier and a little more awkward? Enter The Sushi Bazooka, a.k.a Sushezi.

▼ It’s made by Hydraflow Industries Ltd. from New Zealand (notice the lightning bolt connecting the flags).

sushijiro-30

Don’t mistake “Sushezi” for a Japanese word, as it includes sounds not commonly used in the Japanese language (“she” and “zi,” namely). They were probably going for a more Japanese-looking spelling though, because the name is pronounced “sush-easy.” Get it? Because it’s sushi and now it’s easy.

So, how does this “SUSHI revolution” contraption work? First, you open it up and line the barrel with rice. The company advises that you grease the bad boy a bit first, because sticky rice, as the name implies, can get a bit sticky. The last thing you want is a clog in your bazooka.

▼ Next, you can put in any ingredients that you want, tuna, cream cheese, egg, etc.

Screen Shot 2015-04-21 at 13.37.11

▼ In Japan, sushi is most often eaten in the nigiri form, a piece of fish laid over a small bed of rice.

1024px-2007feb-sushi-odaiba-manytypes

While makizushi like cucumber or natto rolls are common in Japan, foreign makizushi is a whole different beast. Rarely will you find anything along the likes of a California Roll or a Philadelphia Roll in sushi’s indigenous homeland. But again, that doesn’t mean they aren’t great. Plus, at home, you can use whatever ingredients you want!

Once you’ve filled the barrel to your heart’s content, put the plunger in place, close it up and put on the cap. Now, the fun part! While we wish that you could blast the sushi roll out of the barrel, as the name of the device implies, it’s more of a slow ooze, rather than an explosion.

▼ If only it was as explosive as the pop-text makes it look!

sushijiro-005

After rolling it up in nori seaweed and slicing it up, viola! You have perfectly formed sushi rolls! Yum! It was so “ezi.”

The company came out with this infomercial to advertise their bazooka, but it’s more fun to watch people actually using it in real life, like Seiken, from the Japanese YouTube channel Seiken TV.

▼ He didn’t read the English instructions, so he does some things a little wrong. Also, he’s not very good at using knives…

Really, homemade sushi sounds pretty appealing. It’s cheaper and you can put in exactly what you want, but you do have to actually make it yourself.

What do you think? Would you buy one of these contraptions to make your own rolls or would you stick to a good old bamboo mat? Of course, for lazy people, there’s always the third option of just going to the local sushi bar and paying a professional to make it for you.

Source: Naver MatomeSushezi, YouTube (1stmaytagman)
Images: Strapya World, Sushezi, Wikimedia Commons (Nesnad)