babies

Japan’s top 20 flowery names for baby girls: love, hearts, and dreams

In many English-speaking countries, it’s common to name children after a parent or relative. My dad, oldest brother, and nephew all share the same first name, for example, which provides a link through the generations, plus makes it easy for my mom to simultaneously call them for dinner.

This isn’t really done in Japan, though, and not being tethered to the past means that baby name trends can gather or lose momentum quickly. Recently, Japan is seeing more and more kirakira names. Kirakira literally means “sparkly,” and usually either the combination of kanji characters used to write the name, or the pronunciation itself, is flowery and unique.

But as a list of the top 20 for girls shows, kirakira names aren’t always just flashy, sometimes they’re downright sweet.

Read More

Time to start potty training! Chinese speculators buying up diapers in Japan

Despite policies designed to keep the birth rate in check, China remains the most populous nation on the planet. That many people means a lot of new babies every year, and the digestive tracts of babies in China have as busy a schedule as infants anywhere.

What we’re trying to say is that China has to deal with mountains of baby poop every day. And since some Chinese parents have a penchant for keeping their kids dry with Japanese diapers, consumers in Japan have been reporting shortages of Japanese brand Merries, as Chinese speculators in Japan buy up the local stock.

Read More

Cute attack: China’s 14 new panda cubs lined up in size order 【Video】

When it comes to cuteness contests, even a single panda cub is tough to beat, so you can probably imagine how we squealed like schoolgirls when we stumbled upon this footage of fourteen of them lined up in rows in a crib.

We don’t care how cute your videos of your pet are – unless it’s a duckling wearing a sling or a kitten sneezing feathers while wearing a Pikachu onesie, nothing is going to beat this!

Read More

Japanese mother compares child-rearing techniques in the US and Japan, finds mixed results

Raising children is always difficult, regardless of the country you live in. Whether it’s changing diapers or dealing with the “terrible twos,” it can sometimes seem like children exist solely to make their parents’ lives difficult.

But certain cultural and social factors can have a big impact on the whole process, as one Japanese mother explains after moving back to her home country after many years in the US.

Read More

Japanese Babies Daydream Too! Creative Infant Art a la Mila’s Daydreams Sweeps Japan

Being a new mom is tough (this is just speculation; I haven’t birthed one my own yet). Taking care of a baby is a full-time job, and after an intensive session of feeding, burping, changing, wiping and playing, those few hours of peace that children reward their mothers with during naptime are truly precious—so why not have a little fun with them?

Adele Enersen, a former ad copywriter and full-time mother who lives in Finland, thought to do just that when she created Mila’s Daydreams, a photo blog where she shares the whimsical dreams of her daughter, Mila, as she naps peacefully on canvases of colorful fabrics and household objects.

The blog went viral back in 2010, and in January 2011, Enerson compiled some of the best photos from the blog into her first book, When My Baby Dreams. Now, thanks in part to a similar book published by a Japanese mother, the daydreaming baby photo craze has hit Japan.

Read More

  1. 1
  2. 2
  3. 3