Japan Rail

J!NS and Japan Rail East collaborate to bring a small piece of train history to your face

Having a face like the back-end of a bus is less than desirable, but how about a face like the front of a train?

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Petition gathers support for men-only train carriages in Japan

Man (and woman) is born free and everywhere is in trains.

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Japanese rail employee surprises commuters with unusual-sounding announcement

The difference between this man’s appearance and the sound of his voice has everyone talking.

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Yamanote Line train temporarily suspended after carriage fills with smoke in Tokyo

According to reports, a mobile phone battery pack fire was the cause of the incident.

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Dramatic scenes at Harajuku Station as Typhoon Mindulle makes landfall in Japan

Tokyo’s Yamanote Line was suspended for hours in both directions today due to the incident.

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Japan’s Harajuku Station to be rebuilt ahead of 2020 Tokyo Olympics

East Japan Railway Company today released images of new building designs planned for three stations on two of the city’s popular train lines.

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It is now OK for JR Central train drivers to sip water (without having to file a report about it)

For someone whose job it is to drive a train or a bus full of passengers, the safety of those passengers is paramount. The training these drivers have to go through is pretty intensive and it wouldn’t be surprising to see the list of things they can and cannot do while on the job.

But let’s check a couple of things on this list. Did you know that while a train is stationary, the operator is allowed to take a drink of water? Sounds reasonable. However, did you know that they have to fill out a report every time they do?

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Tokyo’s busiest train lines to get luxury “one-man” express pods by next April

Japan is well-known for its packed commuter trains. For decades, smartly dressed men and women have shuffled wordlessly into train cars each morning, all painfully aware that they will soon be getting up-close and personal with total strangers and have nowhere to run, hide, or even breathe freely until their stop. Glove-wearing station staff pack passengers in as tightly as they’ll go without them popping out the other side, each firm shove accompanied by a polite word or phrase thanking passengers for moving all the way inside the car or warning them to keep their various appendages clear of the (just barely) closing doors.

But earlier today, Japan was given a glimpse of a much more civilised, luxuriant commuting experience that may soon put an end to these sardine-can shenanigans. Better yet, this logistical revolution is coming soon: not twelve months from now, commuters will be able to zip into Tokyo in style, lying back in comfortable faux-leather chairs inside sleek, aerodynamic private pods that resemble something out of Minority Report.

This, ladies and gentlemen, is the next generation of luxury travel, and its name is Kosoku.

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