single life

Japanese survey reveals having a significant other slows your pace, makes you lazier

Meanwhile, single men and women rush through their daily lives as if it’ll end tomorrow.

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Japanese brand comes out with a comfy-looking kotatsu made for one

Winter is undoubtedly the worst season to be alone in Japan. Soon singles will be starting the annual desperate search for the special someone to spend Christmas with and it’s not hard to see why. Having someone to cuddle up to during the upcoming cold, long months is far preferable to fighting off the chill by yourself.

Of course, not everyone wants to jump into a relationship just for a little extra body heat, and now thanks to one Japanese electronics maker and their kotatsu for one, singles just might be in for the warmest winter yet.

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The amazing art of the “girlfriend” selfie: A DIY guide

Don’t coupley photos like this just make you sick? Half sick with envy, and half sick with plain nauseating cuteness. This is Keisuke Jinushi, a bright-eyed young lover, obviously infatuated, being lovingly hand-fed and spoiled by his devoted girlfriend.

Or is it? Let’s take another look. Actually, these photos are nothing more than cunningly framed selfies! But how did he do it alone?

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‘Who needs marriage?’ 33 percent of Japanese think marriage is pointless

Go to college, get a job, meet a guy or girl, and…don’t get married?

A recent survey suggests that almost one-third of Japanese people just can’t see the point in tying the knot and settling down. And after you see what some of them have to say about marriage, you might understand why!

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Gamers’ paradise: 2/3 of Japanese citizens over 50 to live alone by 2035

The idea of living alone in Japan is a relatively new one. In the past, as with many countries, people tended to live with their families–either their parents or their children and spouses–for almost their entire lives. Obviously, the college years were a time for people to get out of the house, as it were, but even then, many students opted to live at home and commute to school. After all, it’s pretty hard to say “no” to a home-cooked meal, little or no rent and clean laundry.

But that trend has been steadily reversing itself as Japan becomes more and more a society of single-person households. (Can we blame them?) In fact, it is estimated that by 2035, two thirds of people over the age of 50 will be living alone.

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