law

Warning: The story we are about to tell may not be suitable for the weak-stomached, but if you or someone you know is considering this type of procedure it would be wise to know the risks involved.

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Japan’s public broadcaster wins landmark court case and 12 bucks

NHK’s reign of terror on the Japanese public continues in an unprecedented court victory over a man who engineered his television to refuse their service.

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Japan’s “crying politician” found guilty of fraud

The case of what was arguably Japan’s weirdest political scandal finally comes to a close.

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High school student expelled for having sex, sues school for 6 million yen

Someone’s getting excessively punished here and its up to the courts to decide who.

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Japanese government relaxes “no dancing” regulations, but is it actually an improvement?

The Japanese government has passed a bill relaxing its decades old prohibition on dancing, but the new law may not be much better than the old one.

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Tokyo may soon require bicyclists to strap on a helmet before getting on the road

After 11,000 bike accidents last year, the Tokyo metropolitan government is considering new safety regulations.

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You gotta fight for your right to flash mob?

Is a flash mob protected free speech? The Japanese courts will decide.

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Japanese government hires official pirate hunter to search Internet for illegal anime uploads

Avast, otaku, for the Japanese government is stepping up its piracy countermeasures.

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Japanese kids finally reclaim right to go to video game arcades at night with their parents

After-dinner family sticker pictures will soon be A-OK in the eyes of the law.

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Same-sex prostitution business technically legal in Japan, goes untouched by police

A gaping loophole in Japan’s already grossly outdated law means any same-sex oriented part of the sex-industry can technically operate with total impunity.

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45-year-old man promptly arrested after asking police if it’s okay to date a 15-year-old

Police couldn’t help but think something might be afoot upon hearing the man ask, “Is it a crime to date a 15-year-old?”

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Japanese publisher groups protest “agreement” to cover up adult magazines in convenience stores

Organizations don’t want bare-all periodicals to have to hide under obscuring plastic covers.

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Answerman — Who polices anime copyrights?

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Crying assemblyman Ryutaro Nonomura returns—shaven-headed and with a bizarre new move

Following his tear-drenched press conference and constant ear cupping, disgraced assemblyman Ryutaro Nonomura finally gets his day in court—and shocks the public yet again with a new trademark move.

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Japanese judge dismisses lawsuit against idol singer who violated contract’s no-dating clause

Suit tossed out of Tokyo district court in rare win for idols’ romantic freedom.

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UN urges Japan to ban sexual images of children in manga, Japanese netizens tell UN to shut up

On 26 October, Maud de Boer-Buquicchio, the UN Special Rapporteur on the Sale of Children, Child Prostitution and Child Pornography, wrapped up a week-long visit to Japan with a press conference at the Japan National Press Club.

During her hour-long speech, De Boer-Buquicchio implored the Japanese government to tighten its relatively lax restrictions on child pornography in which photographs of sexually dressed children and illustrations of children in sexual contexts are still considered legal.

Many other countries would take “legal child porn” to be a serious gap in their law books and promptly get right to work on tougher child porn restrictions. But online comments in Japan have taken the less popular route and rebutted that “the UN should shut-up and mind its own business.”

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Japanese lawyer: Making cosplay for others is copyright infringement

In about a week, Halloween, cosplayers‘ favorite holiday, will be upon us. Millions of people — increasingly including Japanese — will take to the streets in costume, and much of it will be cosplay. But some of this activity may actually be against Japanese law.

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Idol ordered to pay management company 650,000 yen after going to hotel with male fan

Idol singers exist in an extremely specialized, and often contradictory, corner of the already specialized Japanese pop music industry. Successful idols are expected to walk the fine line between having a polished, attractive appearance and an approachable, unassuming aura. Even more ironic is that while their songs’ lyrics are often focused on love and devotion, it’s practically unheard of for an active idol to openly be in a romantic relationship.

Every now and again, though, word gets out that an idol secretly has a boyfriend, or had an illicit liaison with a guy. The revelation is usually followed by a solemn apology to fans, and often the offending member being removed from the group. But this time the story of an idol’s amorous activities coming to light has something we’ve never heard about before: a court-ordered fine equivalent to several thousand dollars for breach of contract.

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Beijing to enact “Good Person Protection Ordinance”

In a lot of major cities around the world, people are hesitant to get involved when they see an injured person. After all, if movies have taught us one thing, it’s that the people who go to check on the fallen hero are often the first to get picked off by a terminator or Mike Myers in hot pursuit.

At best stopping to assist someone with a wound will likely set you off on a journey that Peter Travers of Rolling Stone calls “an rip-roaring, edge-of-your-seat adventure” and seriously, who has time for all that?

That might be why Good Samaritans are hard to come by in big cities everywhere, and in Beijing the government is looking to change that by offering protections in what is casually being referred to as the Good Person Protection Ordinance. However, rather than killbots and monsters, this measure will protect helpful souls from a much more real threat.

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Thousands sign petition against TPP’s supposed copyright conditions

A few months ago, it was reported that the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) Agreement may contain changes to copyright laws that many are calling “excessive.” In response to this, a growing number of lawyers, journalists, writers, and others involved in Japanese culture have signed a petition to convince the Japanese government to refuse such conditions.

If the agreement is reached, the minimum limit of copyrights could be extended by 20 years, and even non-copyright holders such as police and prosecutors may be given the ability to go after people for “infringements”. Those opposed feel that these changes could seriously damage the artistic freedom of Japan.

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