Super NES

Instead of waiting for Nintendo’s Switch, this awesome gamer made his own portable Super Famicom

Sure, Nintendo’s upcoming hybrid system looks cool, but retro gamers are already gushing over this cool customization of a classic console.

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After 27 years, a secret technique for defeating enemies in Super Mario World has just been found

Big Boo doesn’t seem nearly as scary anymore.

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Nintendo’s new Super Famicom-themed 3DS is a blast from its awesome past

Further proof that the company’s 16-bit console was one of the best-looking systems ever made.

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Giant collection of 16-bit Nintendo cover art is ultimate coffee table book for old school gamers

Thanks to modern Internet marketing, it’s unlikely that anyone buys a video game without first having seen multiple gameplay videos of it as various stages of production. Gamers didn’t used to have access to so much information, though. In the 16-bit era, the less developed video game journalism sector meant that only major releases would get spreads in print magazines, and for some niche titles the only available visual preview came on the box itself.

As a result, the cover artwork played a huge role in catching customers’ eyes and conveying the mood and style of the game. Like classic movie posters, the best examples are works of art, and many of them are now being assembled in the upcoming book Super Famicom: The Box Art Collection.

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Hardcore gamer refuses to let game save die, leaves his Super NES on for almost two decades

Umihara Kawase was released for the Super Famicom (Super NES in the west) in December, 1994, just over two decades ago. It was a popular game that has spawned a number of sequels for a variety of platforms and has won its fair share of fans, including many who loved the original cartridge game. Unfortunately, some cartridge games from the 90s featured a fatal flaw in their storage: the batteries keeping players’ saves alive eventually dies.

While most gamers finally give up and waved goodbye to their progress, lost to the ravages of time, one hardcore fan has refused to lose his save and has simply left his console plugged in and switched on for the last 20 years!

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Sunburned Super Famicom catches collector’s eye

As the rainy season in Japan begins to wind down and we head into the sweet spot of midsummer, more and more people are hitting the beach and working on their tans. For followers of a certain fashion aesthetic, there’s nothing more appealing than a beautifully bronzed body, which holds true whether we’re talking about men, women, or even video game consoles, it seems.

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