University of Tokyo

Student from University of Tokyo builds perfect replica MacBook Air using only LEGO bricks

Must resist… urge to… smash to pieces.

Read More

Crazy Tokyo university stairway looks like a real-world graphics glitch

The University of Tokyo is a difficult school to get into, and also around, it seems.

Read More

Japanese researchers redesign electric car to go farther than ever before on a single charge

The Wireless IWM Unit 2 turns a flaw of a electric vehicles into a strength, opening a world of possibilities.

Read More

University of Tokyo students can show off school pride with new jacket boasting ID display pocket

The upcoming product arose out of a collaboration between two University of Tokyo students and a Japanese fashion designer.   

Read More

Great news: New study shows beer may help curb Alzheimer’s

If you’re looking to stave off dementia, it’s Miller time!

Read More

Prestigious Chinese university under fire for allegedly plagiarizing a Japanese PR video

The prestigious Fudan University (复旦大学) in Shanghai, China has been hit by a storm of criticism for allegedly ripping off a PR video which was released by the University of Tokyo last year.

Read More

Autism researchers in Japan investigate whether oxytocin nasal spray could alleviate symptoms

While the following research study at the University of Tokyo has been going on for over a year now, we feel it’s important enough to bring to your attention, especially following recent medically related events. For the past month or so in the States, autism has once again been thrust into the national spotlight surrounding a “debate” about whether childhood vaccinations could lead to the neurodevelopmental disorder after an outbreak of the preventable measles disease was traced back to California’s Disneyland. Though the original study which found a link between vaccinating children and autism has since been disproved, a number of parents still maintain that a link exists between the two.

That being said, this ongoing Japanese study has been investigating the possibility of whether a nasal spray containing the hormone oxytocin could reduce the severity of symptoms in people with relatively mild forms of autism.  

Read More